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  • 09 Jun 2016 2:21 PM | Anonymous

    NATIONAL CONVENOR’S UPDATE

    Prue Warrilow

    ACCS has been involved in a wide range of activities in 2015 financial year. At a national level we continue to deliver extremely well for a small voluntary-based organisation. This participation has included:

     Early Childhood Ministerial Advisory Council. This is a challenging environment

    to be in is as the conversations are confidential however, members feedback

    has enabled me to represent ACCS views effectively and enthusiastically

     Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander stakeholder forums and consultations

     ASQA with Brian Newman and Kim Bertino bringing their expertise to proactively

    represent ACCS views in these important forums

     ACECQA - stakeholder forums and individual organisational consultation

     Department of Education consultations and stakeholder meetings

     a variety of submissions that emanated from the Productivity Commission review,

    Regulatory Impact Statement and related enquiries 

     Families Australia that I Chair as ACCS nominee ensuring that the children's

    services voice is heard in the wider child and family services arena

     Early Learning Everyone Benefits where ACCS was asked to be a participant in the reference group

    In the 2015 financial year I spent around nine weeks (343 hours) actively engaged in ACCS work. I'm not alone in doing this work as I am supported by a strong executive, and other state/territory members who participate as  ACCS representatives in a variety of different forums.

    ACCS has also managed a significant transition with the secretariat moving from Community Child Care Victoria (CCCVic) to Barbara Romeril. I want to thank Lynn Turner from CCCVic and Barbara for facilitating such a smooth transition enabling ACCS to continue to function throughout this process.

    There are a number of critical issues and risks that I think ACCS needs to consider moving forward.

    These are:

     emerging alternate ECEC voices with extensive paid resources in advocacy and

    media

     ACCS staying relevant as part of the national agenda including looking at

    leveraging existing relationships, both professional and personal. Early Learning Everyone Benefits is an example of this kind of leveraging

     the election and ongoing conversations around the Jobs for Families package. This is most likely to be implemented in 2018 financial year, potentially post introduction of a new IT system enabling monitoring and measuring of family attendance by hours used not hours booked. This could result in a shift to funding for hours used only I want to thank Barbara Romeril in fulfilling the secretariat role in helping to ensure that ACCS voice is out and about.

    I want to thank all of the executive and their active participation in driving ACCS forward. Without the executives commitment, enthusiasm and experience this would not be possible. ACCS is only as strong as the member voices that enhance our conversations. It has been a privilege to work with the executive and ACCS members over the past year.

    ACCS and the Federal Election

    In the current federal election campaign, ACCS will be assessing the policies of the major parties against what we see as the key policies that Australia needs in order to support its children to thrive:

     Build a skilled and professional early childhood workforce – no HECS fees, free TAFE

     No children and their families in detention in Australia or off-shore

     Increase the maximum hours of subsidised early childhood education and care for children of non-working parents to 2 days per week or 18 to 24 hours per week

     Increase the fee subsidy for low income families to 90 per cent of the full costs of ECEC and to 100 per cent of the full costs for children who are at risk or vulnerable

    We also urge the parties to commit to implementing the following policies:

     Maintain current Priority of Access criteria to ensure access for families experiencing vulnerability or disadvantage

     Continue full implementation of National Quality Framework

     Invest in availability – capital grants, low/no interest loans to not-for-profit providers;

    investment in flexible services (mobiles, occasional care, Aboriginal services);

    investment in planning for early and middle years services

     Provide government paid parental leave ACCS is also actively supporting the sector campaign Early Learning Everyone Benefits, which is already having an impact on the policies of the major parties.

    Early Learning: Everyone Benefits National Campaign

    ACCS is proud to be an active supporter of the campaign for two days a week of quality early learning for all Australian children.

    To find out more visit: www.everyonebenefits.org.au

    Early Learning: Everyone Benefits is a positive national campaign which aims to:

     increase public awareness and understanding of the benefits of investing in early learning (birth to five years) for Australia’s future prosperity

     increase access to quality programs that amplify children’s development by securing political commitment to increasing early learning.

    It is supported by leading Australian early childhood peak bodies, research and advocacy organisations, and service providers.

    Early learning means the vital stages of children’s development from birth to age five, including brain development, cognitive skills, motor skills, social and emotional wellbeing—all of the skills needed for lifelong learning. Early learning occurs in formal settings (early childhood education and care) with educators but also at home and in relationships with family members and caregivers. Our campaign recognises that the main vehicle for children’s learning is play.

    Why invest more in early learning?

     One in five Australian children start school vulnerable in their social, emotional or cognitive development and will fail to catch up, according to the Australian Early Development Census. For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children it’s more than two in five who are vulnerable.

     Australian and international research tells us that attending at least two days of early learning per week improves children’s educational outcomes at school up to 13 years later.

     Children who attend a high-quality early childhood program in the year before school are up to 40 per cent ahead of their peers by the time they reach Year 3 in primary school.

     By age five, a child’s vocabulary will predict their educational success and outcomes at age 30.

     All children benefit from early learning, and vulnerable children benefit the most.

    Why this campaign is important:

     Australia is in the bottom third of OECD countries for attendance of three year olds in early learning.

     Participating in quality early learning (birth to five years) can greatly improve young children’s:

    o social and emotional skills

    o physical wellbeing

    o communication and cognitive abilities in literacy and numeracy—up to 13 years later.

    This campaign is about educating the Australian community and politicians about the importance and benefits of early learning.

    Our goals

     To have all Australian children benefit from participating in early learning, particularly vulnerable children who will gain the most.

     To have political parties commit to policies that will support 100 per cent of four year olds and 90 per cent of three year olds to attend early learning for at least two days per week, and for younger children to be able to attend as needed by their families.

     To change the national conversation on the value of early learning and convince our politicians that supporting attendance in early learning today will increase the future prosperity for all of us.

    Join us to spread the word that our future prosperity depends on how we invest in our children today!

    CAMPAIGN TO PREVENT LOWERING OF SCHOOL ENTRY AGE IN TASMANIA

    Zoe Manning and Josique Lynch 

    The Tasmanian Government is reviewing the Education Act. The ECEC sector in Tasmania is deeply concerned that one of the key reforms under the draft Bill is to lower the school starting age. A Regulatory Impact Statement is out, seeking feedback including what impact this change would have on the operations of ECEC services if children are attending 15 hours per week of kindergarten in a school setting.

    Part of the rationale for the change is that Tasmania has the oldest school starting age of all states and territories for children entering full‐time school. The  government asserts that children in other states and territories are able to begin fulltime school when they are three to seven months younger than their Tasmanian counterparts.

    However it is not easy to compare kindergarten age and attendance between states and territories accurately because relatively few kindergarten programs interstate operate within the school system, as in Tasmania.

    Western Australia has a similar system, with the non-compulsory Kindy Year delivered in schools. It has become the year that the majority of children enter the formal school system, primarily because parents believe that their children must attend or they’ll be left behind. Also it is less costly than paying child care fees.

    The schools do a good job at marketing their Kindy programs to parents with many offering familiarisation sessions for very young children, siblings of Primary School age children, well before Kindy age. Universal Access dollars go only to Education Department early learning programs in WA so the Kindy hours have increased from 11 hours per week to 15 hours.

    The school starting age was lowered in WA about 5 years ago; so children start the first year of compulsory schooling if they turn 5 by June of that year.

    Another reason given by the Tasmanian Government for the proposed change is that it provides earlier access to quality early learning and development experiences for all children. But what do they mean by ‘quality early learning’? It is concerning that the government believes that formal literacy training at an earlier age will improve literacy levels.

    In a recent opinion piece in the Hobart Mercury, the Tasmanian Education Minister referred to ‘benefits of early engagement in positive play-based learning environments ... at … a school’. There seems to be confusion within the Government about the difference between access to early childhood education and access to education.

    There is no question that children (especially the vulnerable) benefit from access to high quality early education and care; our concern is that the formal school setting is not the best environment from a safety and emotional security point of view.

    In early learning programs in schools in WA, play is limited in many cases and is timetabled rather than the concept of Learning Through Play being central to the program’s philosophy.

    Impact on Children The level of individual maturity and child independence varies significantly within the 3-5 year old cohort. They have vast differences in their level of emotional security and resilience, selfmanagement and practical independence. Many 3 ½ year olds are still requiring sleep or rest during the day and some are still in nappies or toilet training and require assistance. Will kindergartens in schools be equipped to respond sensitively?

    The WA experience confirms t hese fears. There is a lot expected of these young children in WA who are expected to be ‘school ready’ as early as 3.5years of age, for example, they are expected to know how to write their names, be able to sit andlisten for an extended period of time, count and do simple sums, and ‘behave’ in structured environments. These young children have not yet developed self-regulation skills, so there has been a reported increase in the level of anxiety among young children as a result.

    In Tasmania, there are concerns about young children being in before and after school care, potentially 3 ½ year olds in with 12 year olds. Also 3 ½ year olds could potentially be in 4 different settings outside of the home each week (before school care, kindergarten, after school care and LDC) – not the continuity of care promised in the Early Years Learning Framework.

    Impact on ECEC Services

    The loss of income to FDC and LDC could potentially close many services and those that can remain open may not be able to provide as high a quality of program due to the loss of economy of scale. LDC estimate that if 3 ½ year olds were to attend kinder 15 hours per week utilisation would decrease 40%; this would rise to 75% for services that run just 3-5 year old programs. If Centres or FDC providers in rural and remote areas become unviable they will have to close.

    Impact on Families

    If services are forced to close, families will have no choice by to leave children in “backyard care” or force the parent out of the workforce due to care not being available.

    The reduction in utilisation for older children will mean that fees for younger children will need to rise.

    The Tasmanian Minister acknowledges the need to invest in changing schools to be able to deliver quality ECEC to younger children, including teacher qualifications and promotion of the EYLF. Given past history, the ECEC sector is not confident that this can be done.

    It was reported in the WA newspapers recently that as a result of falling literacy and numeracy levels it is proposed that the Kindy age children will be tested before they begin school! Is this the future for Tasmania’s young children?

    ACCS WA Branch Update

    Sally Griffiths

    Western Australian branch of ACCS, Carewest has been working diligently to promote the sustainability of the organisation. With the election of a new Executive Committee earlier in the year there is a new found enthusiasm. Subsequently a subcommittee has been organised to research and implement strategies to promote membership and services for the NFP community based sector in WA.

    Members both past and present are being surveyed to identify the challenges they are currently facing for the peak body to ascertain how it may be able to assist them.

    A Professional Development program has also been developed providing very affordable and valuable support for directors reflective of the survey’s responses including recruiting and managing employees and maintaining mental health and wellbeing.

    There has been a positive response to date and we seek to ensure a strong and motivated approach as we build membership and participation. In addition we have been liaising with the local ECA branch to support and spread the word about the Everyone Benefits Campaign.

    WA delegates have also organised to meet with the state Education Minister Peter Collier to welcome him and discuss important issues for the sector and introduce the ACCS Election Platform along with supporting evidence to promote NFP quality early childhood services for every child.

    ACCS AGM and Face-to-face Meeting in October

    ACCS National Council held its AGM in May and for the first time, we had an election for National Convenor. Prue Warrilow was returned as National Convenor and the Executive is:

    National Convenor: Prue Warrilow (NSW)

    Deputy National Convenor: Linda Davison (Vic)

    Secretary: Kim Bertino (NSW)

    Treasurer: Sally Griffiths (WA)

    The annual face-to-face meeting is scheduled to be held during the ECA National Conference in Darwin in October. The Executive will plan an agenda to enable members to discuss a key policy issue facing the early childhood sector in the wake of the result of the current federal election.

    At this stage, the plans for the meeting are:

    Date: Thursday 6 October

    Time: lunch break in the ECA national conference program

    Venue: Room 4 at the Darwin Convention Centre

    We hope you are planning to attend the conference, so keep an eye out for final details of the ACCS national policy discussion.

    To join ACCS or to unsubscribe from this email list, contact the delegates in your state or territory:

    NSW: Prue Warrilow, National Convenor, p.warrilow@familiesatwork.com

    Kim Bertino, National Secretary, Kim.Bertino@ku.com.au

    VIC: Linda Davison National Deputy Convenor, clarendon.cc@kindergarten.vic.gov.au

    Lynn Turner, lturner@cccinc.org.au

    WA: Sally Griffiths, National Treasurer, sally.unicare@bigpond.com

    Josique Lynch, joonccc@iinet.net.au

    Alisha Berry, joonccc@iinet.net.au

    TAS: Zoe Manning, z_manning@netspace.net.au

    SA: Lee Jones, Lee.jones410@schools.sa.edu.au

    Robyn Geisler, lurra.childcare@internode.on.net

    QLD: Cathy Kennedy, cathy.kennedy@cofcqld.com.au

    Kerrie Wilson, aspencomcentre@gmail.com

    NT: Cheryl Anderson, grayccc@bigpond.net.au


  • 30 May 2016 8:20 AM | Anonymous

    In just two weeks, thousands of people like you have pledged their name in support of two days of quality early learning for all children.

    This is a good start, but we need your help to go even further.

    Building support for this campaign through online engagement is crucial to build momentum and community support for greater investment in early learning for our children. To do this, we need you to share our content amongst your friends, colleagues and families.

    Can you share this video from our campaign launch on your Facebook page? In just under two minutes, the video outlines exactly what we aim to achieve for the campaign: access to quality early learning for all children.

    ELEB

    Don’t have Facebook? No issue, we need you to share this link to as many people as possible, so they can pledge their name to the campaign. Put it in your bulletins, tell your friends about it, and help us keep the campaign growing.

    Together, we can keep building this movement and can demonstrate that a quality future for our children means a quality future for Australia.

    Kind regards,
    The Early Learning: Everyone Benefits Team

    Early Learning: Everyone Benefits Campaign · Australia 
    This email was sent to 
    julia@ecqservices.com.au. To stop receiving emails, click here
    You can also keep up with Early Learning - Everyone Benefits on 
    Twitter or Faceboo


  • 10 May 2016 9:52 AM | Anonymous

    Early Learning: Everyone Benefits is a positive campaign which aims to:

    • increase public awareness and understanding of the benefits of investing in early learning for Australia’s future prosperity; and
    • increase access to quality programs that amplify children’s development. 

    Why invest more in early learning?

    • One in five Australian children start school vulnerable in their social, emotional or cognitive development and will fail to catch up, according to the Australian Early Development Census.
    • Children who attend a high-quality early childhood program in the year before school are up to 40 per cent ahead of their peers by the time they reach Year 3 in primary school.
    • All children benefit from early learning, and vulnerable children benefit the most. 
    • By age five, a child’s vocabulary can predict their educational success and outcomes at age 30.

    How do all Australians benefit?

    • It’s cost effective for everyone—studies show the greatest return on educational investment is made during the first five years.
    • Improved outcomes for children accessing quality early learning flow on to huge economic and social benefits for all of us—estimated to contribute up to $10 billion to our economy by 2050, according to areport by PricewaterhouseCoopers.
    • Children who start school in good shape can develop the expertise and skills to become productive members of the workforce and contribute to society.
    • Most importantly, investing in the early years for vulnerable children breaks the cycle of disadvantage.  

     


  • 10 May 2016 9:46 AM | Anonymous




    10 days to the start of National Families Week!
    Last chance to order free promotional products

    115,000 people already registered to participate in events around the nation.
    Register your event now or find an event near youMore

    • Welfare provisions in the 2016 Federal Budget. The Hon Christian Porter MP, Minister for Social Services: More
    • Tammy Williams appointed Commissioner for Queensland Child & Family Commission: More
    • You are invited to a Multicultural Forum run by the Royal Commission: Canberra, 10 May: More
    • Royal Commission closing applications for private sessions on 30 Sept 2016: Contact via email
    • NSW FACS commissioned review of case management models in services for vulnerable families. PRC: More
    • Funding grants announced for community organisations with philanthropic partnerships. Australian Govt: More
    • Report on young people and self harm. Orygen: More
    • Poor health and social wellbeing outcomes recognised through study on childhood adversity. SRN: More
    • Campaign promotes the benefits of investment in early learning. Early Learning: Everyone BenefitsMore
    • Cradle 2 Kinder provides early parenting support to vulnerable young mothers and families. VACCA: More
    • Webinar 17 May, Engaging Communities: what's involved and how it's done. CFCA: More
       
    SURVEYS                               
    • 2016 Federal Election Youth Survey to highlight issues of young people. Youth Action and ARACY: More
    • Final call: 10min survey on factors that influence where children are placed on entering OOHC. ACCP: More
    RESOURCES
    • GAYBY BABY School Action Toolkit, Australia’s first comprehensive education resource to represent same-sex parented families and explore family diversity. Be an ambassador for your school community and download the toolkit today: More
    • The Antidote to Apathy - a 7min Tedx talk on the barriers to community engagement. Sustaining Community: View
    PUBLICATIONS


    Australian Government Department of Social Services (2016).Hearing her voice: Report from the kitchen table conversations with culturally and linguistically diverse women on violence against women and their children. 

    Australian Human Rights Commission (2016). Willing to Work:National Inquiry into Employment Discrimination against Older Australians and Australians with Disability.

    Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2016. Child protection Australia 2014–15. Child welfare series no. 63. Cat. no. CWS 57. Canberra: AIHW.

    Tim Moore, Myfanwy McDonald, Harriet McHugh-Dillon and Sue West (2016). Community engagement: A key strategy for improving outcomes for Australian Families. CFCA Paper No. 39. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies
     

    CONFERENCES, EVENTS & TRAINING
     


    2016 Child Aware Approaches Conference
    AASW & ACWA CPD accredited
    2 week countdown!
    Reduced rates for groups and students
    REGISTER NOW


    3rd Biennial Australasian Implementation Conference

    Melbourne: 5-6 October
    Call for Abstracts closes 8 MayMore



    2016 Family Day Care Conference 
    Perth: Saturday 21 May
    Child Australia and Family Day Care WA: More




    Families Australia is a national, member-based, not-for-profit, peak organisation that promotes the needs and interests of families.

      CEO Fortnightly Blog
      'How are we going to
       improve child safety?'


    Families Australia membership benefits: priority notification for National Families Week, reduced fees at events, participation in national policy forums and engagement with a diverse network of organisations committed to the wellbeing and interests of Australian families. 

    Families Australia welcomes new members to share our vision 'that Australian families, in all their diversity, enjoy the greatest possible wellbeing'. Join

    National Coalition of Child Safety and Wellbeing: More
    Information about the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children and the Third Action Plan (2015 - 2018) is available here. 

     
    The Alliance for Forgotten Australians Inc.
    PO Box 212 Camberwell VIC 3124
    admin@forgottenaustralians.org.au
    T: +61 488 460 646 
    www.forgottenaustralians.org.au

    National Long-term Outcomes for Forgotten Australians (LOFA) study
    UNSW is seeking participants to take part in this national survey of Forgotten Australians. Closing 30 April. Information about ethics and the purpose of the survey available here. The on-line survey is available here. Resources here.

    Forgotten Australians resources:
    Educational booklet. D
    ownloadhere.
    Educational DVD. View here

    Find and Connect Australia.
    Connect to your local Forgotten Australians support service on 1800 16 11 09. Find State-based historical information:
     More


  • 10 May 2016 9:43 AM | Anonymous

    With just over two weeks to go, we are excited to
    share some news about our keynote addresses


     

    Ms June Oscar AO wins International Award

     

    Congratulations to June Oscar who has just won the prestigious Desmond Tutu Reconciliation Fellowship 2016. She will receive her award on 19 May.

    June is delivering the Families Australia Oration, Healing to thrive: building the collective strengths of our families for positive generational change, on Day One of the conference.






    Young Experts to join Children's Commissioners on Panel

             

      Panellists: Cheryl VardonMark Morrissey, Adina Gunnis, Matthew BambrickBrookeAlasdair Roy (Chair)

     

    The Expert Panel convened to address the conference key theme, Supporting young people in out-of-home care to flourish in adulthood is finalised.

    “The way adults conceptualise children and young people has a significant impact on the policies, procedures and legislation adults create to support (and sometimes control) children and young people.” Be prepared for a conversation that will encourage us to think about organisational culture and practice as three young people join Children’s Commissioners to explore this inherent power imbalance and the impact it has on the lives of children and young people, including those in care.


     



    National Framework Symposium
     

          

     

    Panellists: Dr Brian Babington,  Dr Ros Baxter,  Dr Mark Collis,  Ms Cathy Taylor,  Mr Richard Weston,  Ms Maree WalkAndrew McCallum AM (Chair)


    A panel representing the National Coalition on Child Safety and Wellbeing, Commonwealth, States and Territories will open Day Two of the Conference. Panellists will provide insights into the Third Action Plan of the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009 - 2020 Strategies and Implementation Plans. In particular, they will highlight ways in which the Third Action Plan aligns across national and jurisdictional policy and service delivery.

    This will be an exciting opportunity for delegates to engage with speakers and focus on how local communities and organisations can contribute to, and work with, the Third Action Plan, Driving Change: Intervening Early.



    Rates cheaper than early bird are available for three delegate registrations.
    Highly competitive Student registration rates are available.

    AASW and ACWA CPD endorsed - go in the draw to win the cost of your registration back by
    adding the organisation that referred you (AASW or ACWA) during registration.

     

    REGISTER NOW


    About the Conference

    The two day conference aims to advance the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children 2009 – 2020, the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010 – 2022,and the wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The conference is supported by the Australian Government Department of Social Services.

    CAA 2016  provides an exciting opportunity to advance thinking, showcase promising and innovative practice, encourage policy discourse and analysis and help to chart directions in three key areas:

     

    1. Advancing children’s development and wellbeing in the first 1000 days.
    Keynote speaker: Professor Kerry Arabena

    2. Supporting young people in out-of-home care to flourish in adulthood.
    Keynote speakers: Panel of Young Experts and State/Territory
    Children's Commissioners

    3. Building child safe organisations and environments.
    Keynote speaker: Professor Ross Homel AO

     


    The 2016 Child Aware Approaches Conference will be held at the

    Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, Monday 23 - Tuesday 24 May 2016.


    View the Program




    childawareconference.org

    #childaware


  • 18 Apr 2016 6:31 PM | Anonymous

    NAPCAN recognises people and organisations playing their part
    in keeping children safe through the Play Your Part Awards: More

    • Grant applications for the Perpetrator Interventions Research Stream close 28 April. ANROWS: More
    • Call to reduce Indigenous child over-representation in out-of-home-care. SNAICC: More
    • Find out about the Parent Engagement Project (2014-2018) or join its network. ARACY: More
    • National Children's Commissioner's response to Royal Commission report. AHRC: More
    • Free Webinar: Mental Health Reform at the Crossroads with Frank Quinlan. 27 April. CFCA: More
    • Adults Surviving Child Abuse (ASCA) rebranded. Now Blue Knot Foundation: BKF: More
    SURVEYS                               
    • 2016 Federal Election Youth Survey to highlight issues of young people. Youth Action and ARACY: More
    • Governments, NGOs and researchers are invited to contribute to the Survey of Child Protection Research & Evaluation Programs 2011-2015. CFCA: More
    RESOURCES
    • Help for victims of child abuse fact sheet, Limitation Act Amendment. NSW Govt: More
    • Website launch, Start Early: respectful relationships for life. ECA: More
    • Sharing stories of family & domestic violence, Not the only one. UoM. More
    • Roadmap to selecting an evidence-based practice. CEBC: More
    • Positive mental health poster: When we feel safe, we explore, we learn, we grow. KidsMatter: More
    • Video: Blended families: being a step-parent. RCN: More
    PUBLICATIONS


    Angela Carnovale (2016).Hear me out: Women's experiences of seeking help for domestic violence in the ACT. Women's Centre for Health Matters: Canberra

    Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council (2015). Healthy, Safe and Thriving: National Strategic Framework for Child and Youth Health, COAG Health Council: Adelaide

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. (2012). The Science of Neglect: The Persistent Absence of
    Responsive Care Disrupts the Developing Brain: Working Paper 12
    . http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu

    NT Council of Social Service (2015). Vision for a coordinated service system to promote child and family wellbeing.

    UNICEF Office of Research (2016). Fairness for Children: A league table of inequality in child well-being in rich countries, Innocenti Report Card 13, UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti, Florence
     

    CONFERENCES, EVENTS & TRAINING
     


    2016 Child Aware Approaches Conference
    AASW & ACWA CPD accredited
    Reduced rates for groups and students
    REGISTER NOW


    PD: The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne

    Supporting professionals in their work
    with children and families: More



    PD: Working therapeutically with people who have
    complex trauma histories
     
    Canberra: 16-17 June
    Blue Knot Foundation: More


    Event Registration now open for National Families Week 2016
    More than 80,000 people already registered

    Register soon to ensure promotional products
    arrive in time for your event!

    Families Australia is a national, member-based, not-for-profit, peak organisation that promotes the needs and interests of families.

      CEO Fortnightly Blog
      'ReThinking
       Orphanages'


    Families Australia membership benefits: priority notification for National Families Week, reduced fees at events, participation in national policy forums and engagement with a diverse network of organisations committed to the wellbeing and interests of Australian families. 

    Families Australia welcomes new members to share our vision 'that Australian families, in all their diversity, enjoy the greatest possible wellbeing'. Join

    National Coalition of Child Safety and Wellbeing: More
    Information about the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children and the Third Action Plan (2015 - 2018) is available here. 

     
    The Alliance for Forgotten Australians Inc.
    PO Box 212 Camberwell VIC 3124
    admin@forgottenaustralians.org.au
    T: +61 488 460 646 
    www.forgottenaustralians.org.au

    National Long-term Outcomes for Forgotten Australians (LOFA) study
    UNSW is seeking participants to take part in this national survey of Forgotten Australians. Closing 30 April. Information about ethics and the purpose of the survey available here. The on-line survey is available here. Resources here.

    Forgotten Australians resources:
    Educational booklet. D
    ownloadhere.
    Educational DVD. View here

    Find and Connect Australia.
    Connect to your local Forgotten Australians support service on 1800 16 11 09. Find State-based historical information:
     More


  • 13 Apr 2016 12:15 PM | Anonymous

    Free registration offer for one lucky member

    of each of these associations:




            

    One lucky member of both AASW and ACWA will be refunded the full cost of their registration
    to the 2016 Child Aware Approaches Conference.

    To apply, just write "Australian Community Workers Association"  or "AASW" when asked
    which organisation referred you during the registration process.

    If you have already registered, you can edit your registration by email to be in the running for this prize.
    The lucky winners will be notified one week prior to the conference.

    The Child Aware Approaches Conference is accredited for CPD points from both ACWA and AASW.
     

    Register and apply now 


     
    Competitive rates are available for members and non-members as well as
    a highly discounted rate for three delegate groups and students. 

     

    The two day conference aims to advance the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children 2009 – 2020, the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010 – 2022,and the wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The conference is supported by the Australian Government Department of Social Services.

    CAA 2016  provides an exciting opportunity to advance thinking, showcase promising and innovative practice, encourage policy discourse and analysis and help to chart directions in three key areas:


     

    1. Advancing children’s development and wellbeing in the first 1000 days.

    2. Supporting young people in out-of-home care to flourish in adulthood.

    3. Building child safe organisations and environments.

     

    The 2016 Child Aware Approaches Conference will be held at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, Monday 23 - Tuesday 24 May 2016.
     


    REGISTER NOW


    View the Detailed Program



    childawareconference.org

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  • 11 Feb 2015 8:46 AM | Deleted user

    As you would know by now Tony Abbott announced that the Governments planned  paid parental leave scheme will not go ahead. His speech at the National Press Club did not give any further details about whether the company levy that was  going to partly fund the scheme would go ahead. Although he made broad statements about the value of good child care policy both for families and the economy there was no detail. Scott Morrison has made comments to the media  supporting a commitment to quality including ratios and qualifications .

    Some of the media commentary about this is  included below – the relevant excerpt from the National Press Club speech is at the end of the email.

    We don't need more consultation, it's time to act on childcare 

    Sydney Morning Herald-14 hours ago

    I've always had an image of a beleaguered commission with families screaming at it, "Fix the fact that childcare is too expensive and fix the fact ...

    Parents pleased with govt childcare focus

    Sky News Australia-2 hours ago

    Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry head Kate Carnell said boosting childcare support was the only sensible approach to ...

    Big end of town calls for baby levy to be thrown out with PPL
    The Australian-7 hours ago

     

    Scott Morrison proposes childcare and parental leave shake-up

    Sydney Morning Herald-20 hours ago

    A major shake-up of Australia's childcare system is on the cards, with ... the National Press Club on Monday, including potentially scrapping his ...

    Childcare lobby tick for Scott Morrison quality stance

    The Australian - ‎14 hours ago‎

    “Parents would be happy to learn the government has no intention of watering down quality standards in its efforts to address the rising cost of childcare.” Tony Abbott is expected to announce details of a diminished or delayed paid parental leave scheme.

    Morrison puts day care changes on ice

    Sydney Morning Herald-30 Jan 2015

    New Social Services Minister Scott Morrison has shelved changes aimed at tackling "child-swapping" rorts in family day care centres, days ...

    Will Knightmare cost Abbott his paid parental leave policy?

    Women's Agenda-4 hours ago

    Today will be the first time Tony Abbott has addressed the Press Club in his ... The importance of quality in early childhood education can't be ...

    Childcare rebate scheme is failing, with big business facing 1.5 per ...

    The Daily Telegraph-31 Jan 2015

    But Mr Morrison has poured cold water on a single, means tested ... This was a key recommendation of the Productivity Commission's draft ...

    Tony Abbott Press Club speech: Key points and full transcript

    The Australian (blog)-18 hours ago

    Expressed “personal delight and national relief” at the release of Australian journalist ... PRESS CLUB SPEECH: How the afternoon unfolded ...

    Excerpt from National Press Club Speech  Tony Abbott 2/2/15

    “Before Christmas, I said that over the break I’d be better targeting the proposed paid parental leave scheme and scaling it back, in a families package focussed on childcare.

    I admire stay-at-home mums, as Margie was when our children were young, but support better paid parental leave to maximise young people’s – like my daughters’ – choices to have a career and to have a family too.

    I accept, though, that what’s desirable is not always doable, especially when times are tough and budgets are tight.

    As the Productivity Commission has said, and as mums and dads around Australia have reminded me, the focus really does have to be on childcare if we want higher participation and a stronger economy.

    So a bigger parental leave scheme is off the table.

    Values and beliefs are important but the most important consideration of all is what will best help families at this time.

    I know that many women in many families are working just to pay the childcare – because that was the Abbott family’s experience when Margie first went back to work after becoming a mother.

    Childcare fees skyrocketed 50 per cent under Labor which abandoned its promise to build 260 new centres.

    More affordable and more available childcare means less pressure on the family budget.

    More parents in the workforce mean that more people will make a bigger economic contribution as well as a social contribution to our country.

    Women, after all, are our country’s most under-utilised source of skills and entrepreneurship – if female participation in Australia were six per cent higher, at Canada’s level, GDP would be higher by $25 billion a year.

    So a better childcare policy is good economic policy as well as fairer family policy.                                                                                      

    We’ll now consult widely on a way to improve the system of multiple payments, keep costs down, and put more money into parents’ pockets. “

  • 10 Feb 2015 2:48 PM | Deleted user

     

    Plenty going on in the media lately … here is a selection

    Union wants 70pc pay rise for childcare workforce

    The Australian-10 hours ago

    THE childcare union is demanding pay rises of up to 70 per cent for 150,000 workers, comparing their skills to aircraft maintenance engine

    Childcare – the big problem of little people

    Sydney Morning Herald-6 Feb 2015

    Sitting among the playdough and pegboards at a Sydney childcare centre ... What we are looking at is a way to make childcare more affordable 

    Childcare chewing up pay packets

    The Australian-5 Feb 2015

    Nearly 10 per cent want childcare for “personal reasons'', and more than a third seek care for “child-related reasons'' such as education and ...

    Pressure for Tony Abbott as families face $60 a day childcare hike
    The Australian-3 Feb 2015

    Peak childhood body calls for childcare levy to fund reform

    Sydney Morning Herald-5 Feb 2015

    With concerns in the childcare sector that without a levy, the ... climb by up to $10.3 billion by 2050 if children received quality childcare.

    Childcare is not a ''women's issue"

    The Age-6 Feb 2015

    Childcare is not a "women's issue", it is everyone's issue. It needs to include people beyond those directly affected by it and, to do that, the ...

    Morgan Stanley snaps up Australian Childcare Projects

    The Australian-6 Feb 2015

    GLOBAL heavyweight Morgan Stanley Real Estate has purchased developer and operator of childcare facilities, Australian Childcare Projects, ...

  • 20 Mar 2014 3:54 PM | Deleted user

    Some recent media below and attached FYI is a resource from Australian Centre of Excellence for Local Government  with  guidelines for councils in the area of child care provision – includes strategic planning, enhancing supply through land use and working collaboratively with state governments and local communities

     Childcare costs on the rise

    You may remember....... ACCS NSW participated in previous research and report regarding Local Government's involvement in Early Education: You can access this this via Community Child Care Cooperative here: http://ccccnsw.org.au/wp-content/uploads/nsw-childcare-fa.pdf 

    Sydney Morning Herald-24 Jan 2015

    "Women want to work, parents want the best for their kids, and study after study shows that investment in early childhood education rea

    Families could save big on childcare

    NEWS.com.au-24 Jan 2015

    The modelling, by lobby group The Parenthood, will put further pressure on the government to reprioritise spending on childcare as it develops ...

     Cash subsidies for nannies in doubt

    NEWS.com.au-21 Jan 2015

    ... with the massive task of ensuring each subsidised in-home nanny is working under the guidelines set by the National Quality Framework

     Preschool attendance boosts language in disadvantaged children

    The Conversation UK-13 Jan 2015

    Our study reinforces the need for qualified preschool staff and training of preschool providers to recognise the presence, nature and ...

     This Is The Most Brilliantly Simple Idea To Spur Economic Growth ...

    Business Insider Australia-22 Jan 2015

    At the World Economic Forum in Davos, you hear of a lot of vague ... And no childcare worker is employed because of the cost disincentive.

     Childcare is not a nice-to-have, it's a must-have: Barack Obama

    StartupSmart-20 Jan 2015

    It's time we stop treating childcare as a side issue, or a women's issue ... Of course, Obama's comments also make for a welcome contrast to the ...

     Parents hold back their children from kindergarten for an extra year ...

    The Daily Telegraph-23 Jan 2015

    GROWING numbers of parents are holding their children back a year before starting kindergarten so they are bigger, stronger and smarter than

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